A Note From Matthew..

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Matt kayaking with his son Max.  Matt is in the front and Max in the back holding the paddle.  By: Matthew Dietz

 

 

July marks the 24th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, America’s unambiguous mandate to rid this country of disability discrimination, which President George H.W. Bush declared as an obstacle for persons with disabilities to “Independence, freedom of choice, control … and the opportunity to blend fully and equally into the right mosaic of the American mainstream.” When he signed the ADA, President Bush stated – “Let the shameful wall of exclusion finally come tumbling down.”  Twenty-Four years later, the fight continues, this time for the U.S. Senate to ratify the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which ensures that persons with disabilities internationally have the same human rights and dignity as persons with disabilities in the United States. Martin Luther King stated, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere”, and as such, we will continue to fight!

 

 

Why

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“Why?” is the most common question asked when I said that I was going to  change my practice into a non-profit disability rights advocacy center. My reasons are each and every person with a disability that I have represented over the past eighteen years. With every single person, the issue was not about money, but about the dignity of being a human being, and having the same ability to enjoy life as any other person. Even when I was not successful, I was always able to give my clients the power and dignity to fight for their equality and humanity.
This is a new era where people with disabilities eschew labels and demand their rights. Those who are Deaf or who have vision impairments demand equal access to information, those with depression and anxiety demand emotional support animals, those with disabilities demand the right to have their own families
and make their own decisions regarding independent living, and those with learning disabilities demand testing and course accommodations. Disability Independence Group or DIG is an invitation for persons with disabilities to declare their independence from antiquated notions of a second class existence.
Disability Independence Group will be a center where people with disabilities can learn how to enforce their rights and a training center for future lawyers to learn how to enforce the rights of persons with disabilities. It will advocate for a definition of diversity and integration that includes persons with disabilities. DIG will be a hub for the growing internationalization of disability
rights in Central and South America. We have a big job and big dreams. Matt Dietz with Parrot